Installing Debian on an Acer Aspire One 753

This is pretty straightforward with a couple of quirks. Installing stable (squeeze) using the wifi was possible but I had to temporarily configure my router to use WEP (instead of WPA2/PSK) before I could get a connection. Then after installation, the wifi had disappeared. I could’ve investigated, and this post certainly suggests that it is … Continue reading “Installing Debian on an Acer Aspire One 753”

This is pretty straightforward with a couple of quirks. Installing stable (squeeze) using the wifi was possible but I had to temporarily configure my router to use WEP (instead of WPA2/PSK) before I could get a connection.

Network cards recognised during install
Network options during install

Then after installation, the wifi had disappeared. I could’ve investigated, and this post certainly suggests that it is fixable, but installing stable had been an accident. Since I had a clean install, there wasn’t anything to lose. I went back to Old Kent Road, and threw the dice again. The current testing release is wheezy, so I decided to give that a blast.

The wifi options were slightly different this time. I was offered WPA2 and even though I had to manually enter the SSID of the router, network connectivity was a breeze.

Installing Debian Wheezy - WPA2 wifi ok
Debian Wheezy Install

I’d read that it was possible to configure the IP address manually by selecting expert install so I chose that route and got a verbose and interesting journey through the install, which was, on the whole, a piece of cake.

Eject CD, reboot, and hello Gnome 3. Well we can deal with you later. But first, the network. Where’s my wifi gone? I’d used it to install, and now it was gone.

I might have given up around now. I toyed with the settings suggested here without much enthusiasm, and thought that LMDE had been working fine, I could just go back. Why make life hard for myself?

And it was a close thing. I knew it was almost certainly possible to get the wifi working again – it was just how much tinkering under the hood was required. It turned out just to be a loose wire, and the fix was really easy. The only difference I found between my system and the instructions in raghu’s blog, is that the config file is actually:

/etc/NetworkManager/NetworkManager.conf

and not /etc/NetworkManager/nm-system-settings.conf.

So what worked for me was to edit /etc/NetworkManager/NetworkManager.conf, change:

[ifupdown]
managed=false

to

[ifupdown]
managed=true

then restart the network manager. i.e.

/etc/init.d/network-manager restart

(or reboot).

And Bob’s your father’s brother.

so thanks for your blog raghu … if I hadn’t stumbled upon it I’d be back on LMDE.

As it happens, the IP address was allocated using DHCP and I had to configure it manually again, so there was no advantage to using the ‘expert install’ option.

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