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Boxing Day Score Event

Charity Score Orienteering Event, Chopwell Wood, 26th December

1 hour

Dougie Nisbet

I should thank Paul, really. The forecast for today’s orienteering event was terrible and my ribs were a bit sore from an embarrassing 0mph bicycle falling-over-in-slow-motion mishap from Tuesday, and the cat was lying on my feet and the bed was nice and warm, so no point going to Chopwell and getting cold and wet, was there? Except that I’d promised Paul I’d pick him up at 0930, and the handy thing about offering to give someone a lift is that it means you cannot easily extract yourself from the arrangement with any sort of dignity when your excuse is you’d rather stay at home and drink tea.

The decision of my orienteering club to move the annual boxing day event from Durham back to Chopwell had not met with my approval and I fully expected to turn up and find a deserted swamp with people staying away rather than nip out to try their hand at a bit of orienteering. However a respectable 50 adventurers had turned out in the damp for a stomp around Chopwell so I was pleased to be proved wrong.

Paul and I were so early we sat in the car for a while and drank tea and coffee and watched the world go by until we were almost late and had to dash over and register before the 11AM start. Paul was wearing some pretty pitiful looking Fell Shoes ‘just one more wear’ that looked like they weren’t brought by Santa yesterday. He completed his attire by not wearing a watch. That could be tricky in a score event. This wasn’t for any reason of principle – he’d just forgotten to bring one. I feigned sympathy and pretended to look for a spare while realising that he’d have a very difficult time planning any sort of meaningful route when he didn’t know the time of day. For shame. I might make this two victories in a row!

16 controls foundThe 11AM start was that rare thing in an orienteering event, a mass start, which tends to only happen in Score events. Not dissimilar to the start of the Durham Three Peaks. We scattered to all points of the compass and I decided to go for a gentle clockwise sweep of the map picking up as many controls as I could. Route choice was interesting and tricky. All controls had the same value so there were no ‘high-value items’ to be had on the peripheries. Scrabble players would have found it no fun. With each minute late incurring a 10 point penalty, and each control being worth 10 points, the common mistake is to go over time and get a penalty. It’s rare in a score event that getting just one more control is worth the risk of an associated time penalty.

I nabbed 16 controls and got back with 24 seconds to spare, which I thought was pretty dandy. My route choice left a bit to be desired though, spending too much time chasing controls out on the periphery rather than mopping up easy ones close to the Finish. Camilla had struggled with the network of footpaths and the invariable confusion that arises when there are more footpaths on the ground than there are on the map. Judging when a trail is just a temporary trod or a permanent footpath is a difficult call, and it’s not every orienteering map that includes in its legend the rather ominous sounding powerline downhill bike track.

Paul takes his shoes out for a sole-destroying final outing

Paul got back with -13 seconds to spare, which cost him 10 points. Pretty good considering he wasn’t wearing a watch, or the correct number of shoes. He’d started wearing two shoes. And he’d finished wearing two shoes. More or less. Mostly less. His right shoe hadn’t held up well, or at all, and was now a shoe of two halves. As Peter Cook might once have said, I had nothing against his right shoe. Unfortunately, neither did Paul. He’d attempted a mid-race pit-stop to change shoes but sadly I’d taken the car-keys into the woods with me rather than leaving them at registration so that was more time lost for Paul. Still, Every cloud. Never one not to see the bright side of another’s misfortune I realised that this meant I got another victory. Two in a row!

Find Willow’s Collar

What a difference a day makes.

Yesterday I was wondering on whether it’s possible to set up a dumb ‘slave’ iPhone to act as a part of the hive mind and pass on location info about our cats. Today Willow has wandered in, sans collar, and that means no tile either. I haven’t lost my cat, but I have lost his collar.

I’ve marked Willow’s Collar as Lost. I’ve wandered round the garden and the street staring at my iPhone at the slowly rotating grey circle. Nothing yet.

Let the games begin …

my Tiles have arrived

So almost a year after first placing my order my tiles have finally arrived.

the tiles have arrivedFirst impressions? Quite similar to others – they’re bigger than I expected, but light too. When attached to the cats’ collars the tiles can look a little oversized although this seems to bother me more than it bothers them.

The tile uses bluetootRosie showing off her new tileh and as such its range is nothing amazing. I’ve dabbled with bluetooth location devices and know that the “works up to …” type claims need to be treated with some skepticism. So with realistic expectations I was unsurprised to find that I was lucky if detection would work from one end of the house or garden to the other, especially if there’s a brick wall or tree in the way.

The most intriguing aspWillow with new tile on his collarect of the tile concept for me is the idea of the hive mind. Anyone else who has the tileapp installed on their iPhone or iPad should (in theory) be picking up my tiles if they’re in range of that person’s IOS device. This begs the rather interesting question, how many tiles are there in Durham? Given that mine have just arrived and I ordered mine pretty early on, I wouldn’t be surprised if the answer is close to zero. Especially as a fundamental part of the design philosophy is that you don’t know if you’re picking up someone else’s tiles and passing the location info on.

I ordered 8 tiles, a decision partly based on cost, and partly because the tileapp can only register 8 tiles to an account. I’m not sure how that works if you want some more tiles. Perhaps you have to set up multiple accounts. Eight tiles is a nice number. That’s one for each cat, keys, wallet and one or two to experiment with.

However the main problem I’m having with my shiny new tiles is connected to a pretty irritating limitation regarding the amount of accounts that can be registered to a particular tile. Bluetooth only allows one IOS device to be connected to a tile (or any other bluetooth peripheral for that matter) at any one time. Tile explain this in an FAQ and there’s some promising sounding developments about sharing devices in the pipeline.

No matter I thought – I have a spare iPhone after upgrading to the iPhone 5S. My old iphone 4S is still working fine so I decided to install the tileapp on that too and join the Hive Mind. It doesn’t seem to be possible to do much in the app without creating an account but no problem. I created another account with no tiles registered (although it keeps bugging me to do this). I think of this as a slave account. As far as I understand it anyone with an iPhone or iPad should if they wished be able to install the app and act as a sort of volunteer conduit of tile locations. I’ve tried this and it doesn’t work. In theory my iPhone 4S should sit quietly at home and covertly collect tile location info and pass it on the the hive mind. But it’s not working.

Tileapp screenshot

This is a snapshot of the app driving home after an overnight stay away. According to this screenshot the three cats, Rosie, Willow and Mr Mittens have been out of range for around a day. This isn’t the case: they are at home within bluetooth range of an iPhone 4S logged into a tile account.

Logging the iphone into the ‘live’ account sorts things out and the iPhone 4S at home faithfully notes the ‘last seen’ location of the various felines so the handset is working, as is my iPad. Which rather begs the question – if someone else is running the tileapp on their iPhone on their account – will it pick up my tiles and pass the information on? I suspect it may not and I can’t think of a way of testing this apart from what I’ve been doing, which would strongly suggest it doesn’t work. I emailed support via the tile website a few days ago, nothing back yet.